Stanford University

Upcoming Events

Thursday, October 21, 2021
3:00 PM
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384H
Jinyoung Park (Stanford)
In the first part of my talk, I will introduce the Kahn-Kalai Conjecture which is about the relationship between the threshold for an increasing property and its expectation threshold. I will also briefly introduce the resolution of a fractional version of the Kahn-Kalai Conjecture, due to…
Friday, October 22, 2021
4:00 PM
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384H
John Anderson (Stanford University)

Abstract: This talk will describe a global stability result for a nonlinear anisotropic system of wave equations. This is motivated by studying phenomena involving characteristics with multiple sheets as encountered in, for example, the study of light in a biaxial crystal. For the proof, we …

Friday, October 22, 2021
4:00 PM
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384I
Eric Kilgore

Abstract: We describe the construction of gradings in Legendrian Contact homology, beginning with an overview of Maslov & Conley-Zehnder indices and continuing with a discussion of their roles in determining gradings for contact homologies. 

Monday, October 25, 2021
12:30 PM
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383-N
Libby Taylor (Stanford)
Monday, October 25, 2021
12:30 PM
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Zoom
Alex Dunn (Caltech)


We prove, in this joint work with Maksym Radziwill, a 1978 conjecture of S. Patterson (conditional on the Generalised Riemann hypothesis)
concerning the bias of cubic Gauss sums.
This explains a well-known numerical bias in the distribution of cubic Gauss sums first observed…

Monday, October 25, 2021
4:00 PM
Monday, October 25, 2021
4:00 PM
Hunter Spink (Stanford Math)

The classical Erdos–Littlewood–Offord theorem says that for any n nonzero vectors in R^d, a random signed sum concentrates on any point with probability at most O(n^{1/2}). Combining tools from probability theory, additive combinatorics, and model theory, we obtain an anti-concentration…

Tuesday, October 26, 2021
2:30 PM
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Zoom
Tuesday, October 26, 2021
4:00 PM
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383-N
Ciprian Manolescu (Stanford University)

Given a grid diagram for a knot or link K in S^3, we construct a spectrum whose homology is the knot Floer homology of K. We conjecture that the homotopy type of the spectrum is an invariant of K. Our construction does not use holomorphic geometry, but rather builds on the…