Stanford University

Upcoming Events

Monday, January 18, 2021
11:00 AM
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Online
Monday, January 18, 2021
4:00 PM
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Zoom - Please join the math_symplectic email list through mailman.stanford.edu to receive the Zoom link and the password/
Tuesday, January 19, 2021
10:00 AM
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Zoom
Hugo Zhou (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Two knots are said to be homology concordant if they are smoothly concordant in a homology cobordism. One can define a quotient group using homology concordance similarly…

Wednesday, January 20, 2021
12:00 PM
Cole Graham (Stanford University)

We explore one facet of an old problem: the approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws by viscous counterparts. While qualitative convergence results are well-known, quantitative rates for the inviscid limit are less common. In this talk, we consider the simplest case: a one-dimensional…

Wednesday, January 20, 2021
3:15 PM
Zhihan Wang (Princeton)

 The well-known Simons cone suggests that singularities may exist in a stable minimal hypersurface in Riemannian manifolds of dimension greater than 7, locally modeled on stable minimal hypercones. It was conjectured that generically they can be perturbed away. In this talk, we present a way to…

Friday, January 22, 2021
11:00 AM
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Zoom: Please email Jonathan Luk (jluk@stanford.edu) for Zoom link.
Maxime Van de Moortel (Princeton)

Abstract: In General Relativity, an impulsive gravitational wave is a localized and singular solution of the Einstein equations modeling the spacetime distortions created by a strongly gravitating source.

I will present a local theory of the Cauchy problem in U(1)-symmetry for rough data…

Friday, January 22, 2021
12:00 PM
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zoom
Takumi Murayama (Princeton)

Let f :  Y -->X  be a proper flat morphism of algebraic varieties. Grothendieck and Dieudonné showed that the smoothness of f can be detected at closed points of X. Using André–Quillen homology, André showed that when X is excellent, the same conclusion holds when f is a closed flat morphism…

Monday, January 25, 2021
11:00 AM
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Online
Jacopo Borga (University of Zurich)

Consider a large random permutation satisfying some constraints or biased according to some statistics. What does it look like? In this seminar we make sense of this question by presenting the notion of permuton convergence. Then we answer the question for different choices of random permutation…

Monday, January 25, 2021
12:30 PM
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Zoom
Will Sawin (Columbia University)

Abstract: Faltings proved the statement, previously conjectured by
Shafarevich, that there are finitely many abelian varieties of
dimension n, defined over a fixed number field, with good reduction
outside a fixed finite set of primes, up to isomorphism. In joint work

Monday, January 25, 2021
12:30 PM
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TBD