Stanford University

Upcoming Events

Monday, November 18, 2019
12:30 PM
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Math 383-N
Xiaoyu He

Let Col(x) = 3x+1 if x is odd, and x/2 if x is even. The infamous Collatz conjecture states that for every positive integer x, Col^n(x) = 1 for some n. Recently, Tao proved that for any function f(x) increasing to infinity, and almost all positive integers x (in the sense of logarithmic density…

Monday, November 18, 2019
2:30 PM
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Math 383-N
Jeff Manning (UCLA)

Abstract: In the early 1990s Ribet observed that the classical mod l multiplicity one results for modular curves, which are a consequence of the q-expansion principle, fail to generalize to Shimura curves. Specifically he found examples of Galois representations which occur with multiplicity 2…

Monday, November 18, 2019
4:00 PM
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Math 383-N
Benjamin Hoffman (Cornell)
Partial tropicalizations are a kind of Poisson manifold built using techniques of Poisson-Lie theory and the geometric crystals of Berenstein-Kazhdan. They provide a bridge between linear Poisson manifolds and cones which parametrize the canonical bases of irreducible $G$-modules. …
Monday, November 18, 2019
4:00 PM
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Sequoia Hall 200
Philip Wood (UC Berkeley)
Tuesday, November 19, 2019
4:00 PM
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Math 383-N
Michael Willis (UCLA)

I will discuss a method to define Khovanov and Lee homology for links in connected sums of copies of S1 times S2.  From here we can define an s-invariant that gives genus bounds on oriented cobordisms between links.  I will discuss some applications to surfaces in…

Wednesday, November 20, 2019
3:15 PM
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Math 383-N
Wednesday, November 20, 2019
4:30 PM
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Math 384-H
Thursday, November 21, 2019
12:30 PM
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Math 384-H
Jared Weinstein
The aim of this talk is to give a bird's-eye view of the area of mathematics known as the Langlands program.  This is a massive project which attempts to explain those rules by which polynomials factor modulo prime numbers, generalizing the reciprocity laws discovered by Fermat, Euler,…
Thursday, November 21, 2019
2:00 PM
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Math 384-H
Thursday, November 21, 2019
4:30 PM
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Math 380-W
Sergei Tabachnikov (Penn State)
This talk concerns a naive model of bicycle motion: a bicycle is a segment of fixed length that can move so that the velocity of the rear end is always aligned…