Stanford University

Past Events

Friday, February 23, 2024
12:00 PM
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383N
Farbod Shokrieh (University of Washington)

I will describe some connections between arithmetic geometry of abelian varieties, non-archimedean/tropical geometry, and combinatorics. For a principally polarized abelian variety, we show an identity relating the Faltings height and the Néron--Tate height (of a symmetric effective divisor…

Wednesday, February 21, 2024
3:00 PM
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384H
Stepan Kazanin (Stanford)
Wednesday, February 21, 2024
1:40 PM
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383N
Anurag Sahay (Purdue)

The functional equation of the Estermann function (the additive twist of zeta(s)^2) is morally equivalent to the Voronoi summation formula. This can be used, among other things, to study the correlations of the divisor counting function d(n). Motivated by the divisor correlation problem in the…

Wednesday, February 21, 2024
12:00 PM
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384H
Federico Pasqualotto (UC Berkeley)

The singularity formation problem is a central question in fluid dynamics, and it is still widely open for several fundamental models, including the 3d incompressible Euler equations. In this talk, I will first review the singularity formation problem, describing how particle transport poses the…

Tuesday, February 20, 2024
4:00 PM
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383N
Richard Schwartz (Brown)

Suppose you take a 1 x L strip of paper, twist it around in space, and tape the (short) ends together to make a paper Moebius band. In this talk I'll prove that you must have L > sqrt(3) and also that there is a unique limit that emerges if you have examples with L tending to sqrt(3). B.…

Tuesday, February 20, 2024
4:00 PM
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384H
Lars Becker (Bonn)

Abstract: Carleson proved in 1966 that the Fourier series of any square integrablefunction converges pointwise to the function, by establishing boundednessof the maximally modulated Hilbert transform from L^2 into weak L^2. Thistalk is about a generalization of his result, where the Hilbert…

Friday, February 16, 2024
4:00 PM
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383N
Alexandra Stavrianidi (Stanford)

Abstract

Poincaré Lecture
Thursday, February 15, 2024
4:00 PM
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380Y
Alain Goriely (Oxford University)

Illusions have been a constant source of amusement but they are  also a unique gateway into understanding the way we perceive the world and how the brain processes information. Traditional visual illusions often involve a primary element—be it a line or a circle—that undergoes…

Wednesday, February 14, 2024
3:15 PM
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383N
Tristan Ozuch (MIT)

Einstein metrics and Ricci solitons are the fixed points of Ricci flow and model the singularities forming. They are also critical points of natural functionals in physics. Their stability in both contexts is a crucial question, since one should be able to perturb away from unstable models.

Wednesday, February 14, 2024
3:00 PM
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384H
Daniel Kim (Stanford)