Stanford University

Upcoming Events

Friday, March 5, 2021
11:00 AM
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Zoom: Please email Jonathan Luk (jluk@stanford.edu) for Zoom link.
Maxime Ingremeau (Université de Nice)

Abstract: In 1977, Berry conjectured that eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on manifolds of negative curvature behave, in the high-energy (or semiclassical) limit, as a random superposition of plane waves. This conjecture, central in quantum chaos, is still completely open.

In this talk,…

Friday, March 5, 2021
11:30 AM
|
Zoom
Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford)
Friday, March 5, 2021
12:00 PM
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zoom
Arend Bayer (University of Edinburgh)

A Fano variety X can be reconstructed from its bounded derived category D^b(X). How to use this fact to extract
concrete geometric information from D^b(X)? 
In this talk, I will survey one such approach, via certain subcategories of D^b(X) called Kuznetsov components, and stability…

Monday, March 8, 2021
11:00 AM
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Online
Milind Hegde (UC Berkeley)

There has recently been much activity within the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class spurred by the construction of a canonical limiting object, the parabolic Airy sheet, by Dauvergne-Ortmann-Virág [DOV]. The parabolic Airy sheet provides a coupling of parabolic Airy_2 processes — a universal…

Monday, March 8, 2021
12:30 PM
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Zoom
Jiuya Wang (Duke University)

Abstract: The \ell-torsion conjecture states that the size of the \ell-torsion subgroup Cl_K[\ell] of the class group of a number field K is bounded by Disc(K)^{\epsilon}. It follows from a classical result of  Brauer-Siegel, or even earlier result of Minkowski, that the class number |Cl_K| of a…

Monday, March 8, 2021
12:30 PM
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Zoom
Jimmy He (Stanford)

An expander graph is a well-connected finite graph, with one consequence being that random walks mix extremely quickly on them. While it is relatively easy to show that they exist, and in some sense most graphs are expanders, constructing explicit examples is non-trivial. Margulis gave the first…

Tuesday, March 9, 2021
10:00 AM
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Zoom
Allison Miller (Rice University)

An oriented knot is called negative amphichiral if it is isotopic to the reverse of its mirror image. Such knots have order at most two in the concordance group, and many modern concordance invariants vanish on them. Nevertheless, we will see that there are negative amphichiral knots with…

Wednesday, March 10, 2021
12:00 PM
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Zoom: Please email Lenya Ryzhik (ryzhik@math.stanford.edu) to be added to seminar mailing list.
Olivier Pinaud (Colorado State University)

The problem we consider is motivated by a work by B. Nachtergaele and 
H.T. Yau where the Euler equations of fluid dynamics are derived from 
many-body quantum mechanics. A crucial concept in their work is that of 
local quantum Gibbs states, which are quantum statistical…

Wednesday, March 10, 2021
2:00 PM
Slava Naprienko
Wednesday, March 10, 2021
3:00 PM
Daren Chen