Combinatorics

Organizer: jacobfox [at] stanford.edu (Jacob Fox)

 

Past Events

Combinatorics
Thursday, February 29, 2024
3:00 PM
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384H
Dingding Dong (Harvard)

A system of linear equations is Sidorenko over F_p if any subset of F_p^n contains at least as many solutions to it as a random set of the same density, asymptotically as n->infty. A system of linear equations is common over F_p if any 2-coloring of F_p^n gives at least as many monochromatic…

Combinatorics
Thursday, February 8, 2024
3:00 PM
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384H
Matthew Kwan (IST Austria)

Consider a quadratic polynomial Q(x_1,...,x_n) of a random binary sequence (x_1,...,x_n). To what extent can Q(x_1,...,x_n) concentrate on a single value? This is a quadratic version of the classical Littlewood-Offord problem; it was was popularised by Costello, Tao and Vu in their study of…

Combinatorics
Thursday, February 1, 2024
3:00 PM
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384H
David Conlon (Caltech)

We will describe recent progress, in joint work with Jeck Lim, on the study of sumset estimates in higher dimensions. The basic question we discuss is the following: given a subset A of d-dimensional space and a linear transformation L, how large is the sumset A + LA?

Combinatorics
Thursday, January 25, 2024
3:00 PM
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384H
Matija Bucic (Princeton)

Expander graphs are perhaps one of the most widely useful classes of graphs ever considered. In this talk, we will focus on a fairly weak notion of expanders called sublinear expanders, first introduced by Komlós and Szemerédi around 30 years ago. They have found…

Combinatorics
Thursday, November 9, 2023
3:00 PM
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384H
Persi Diaconis (Stanford)

Let w(1),w(2),..., w(n) be positive weights. Put these weights in an urn and draw them out, without replacement, each time picking the next draw with probability proportional to its weight relative to the remaining weights. Let sigma be the resulting permutation of {1,2,...,n}. This model is…

Combinatorics
Thursday, November 2, 2023
3:00 PM
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384H
Rajko Nenadov (University of Auckland)

Consider the following two-player game played on the edges of the complete graph with n vertices: In each round the first player chooses b edges, which they have not previously chosen, and the second player immediately and irrevocably picks one of them and adds it to the initially empty graph G…

Combinatorics
Thursday, October 19, 2023
3:00 PM
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384H
Jared Duker Lichtman (Stanford University)

A set of integers greater than 1 is primitive if no member in the set divides another. Erdős proved in the 1930s that the sum of 1/(a log a), ranging over a in A, is uniformly bounded over all choices of primitive sets A. In the 1980s he asked if this sum is maximized by the set of prime…

Combinatorics
Thursday, October 5, 2023
3:00 PM
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384H
Theo McKenzie (Stanford)

In a vertex expanding graph, every small subset of vertices neighbors many different vertices. Random graphs are near-optimal vertex expanders; however, it has proven difficult to create families of deterministic near-optimal vertex expanders, as the connection between vertex and spectral…

Combinatorics
Thursday, April 13, 2023
3:00 PM
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384H
Tselil Schramm (Stanford)

A graph is said to be a (1-dimensional) expander if the second eigenvalue of its adjacency matrix is bounded away from 1, or almost-equivalently, if it has no sparse vertex cuts. There are several natural ways to generalize the notion of expansion to hypergraphs/simplicial complexes…

Combinatorics
Thursday, March 16, 2023
3:00 PM
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384H
Anqi Li (MIT)

In this talk, we strengthen a result by Ben Green on an analogue of Sárközy’s theorem in the setting of polynomial rings F_q[